Friday, November 18, 2011

40. EPILOGUE

Fifteen years have passed since we left Zambia, but memories are still fresh in my mind. During my idle hours while I recline at home, far away from the hustle and bustle of the city, I let loose my mind to wander along the streets and by-lanes of Mufulira where we spent a good part of our life: quarter of a century.

Pictures of the town depicting house No. 34 which was our home for fourteen years, as my starting point on Faraday drive which was later renamed as David Kaunda drive on either side of which stood the Rose Avenue (Pamodzi) primary school where my son studied and the Mufulira High School where my wife and I taught, the Mine flats at the Top shops where No.3, Mulungushi house accommodated us for another ten years, the Maina Soko road leading to the combined Kitwe-Ndola main road which passes through the edge of the town as Chatulinga road and goes up to the Zairean border of Mokambo giving off a branch namely Chachacha road at the corner of Mufulira Hindu Hall before reaching the town and which goes to the second class trading area passing by the side of Ray's Motti Rozzi garage, bus station and Zesco and then connecting with the road from the second class trading area to Kantanshi while the Jomo Kenyatta road which passes through the main residential area of the upper class miners cuts through the road to Mokambo and becomes the high street which runs in between the Civic centre and the Mufulira hotel leading to the town centre where the main post office and the Zambia National Commercial bank are situated on one side and the Barclays bank on the other, ZCBC shopping mall and Solanki's super market on either side, with a side road to the Malcolm Watson hospital and the posh residential area of the senior staff miners, the high street then giving rise to another road passing in between the second class trading area and the vegetable market, making a semi circle around the grounds of the Ronald Ross Mine hospital and going all the way to the Basuto Road Secondary school (Butondo) and the Kankoyo shaft while the main road from Kitwe-Ndola, after passing along the edge of the town, branching off to the left just before the railway crossing and going straight to the main office and the vast plant area of the Zambia Consolidated Copper Mines, are all etched vividly in my memory. The Eastlea primary school, the Dominican convent, and the Rose Avenue (Pamodzi) primary school where my children Lisa, Liju and Lindsey had their primary education and the High school where my wife and I taught for twenty five years stand up in relief on my mental map of Mufulira.

However, my thoughts always come back and revolve around the few acres of school grounds situated in between the Kafironda club and the Liemba road that goes around the Tennis courts, the Foot ball fields and the Teachers' quarters to join with another road near the Top shop high level water storage tank. This is where Mufulira Secondary School, popularly known as the "High School" is situated. The massive "IN" and "OUT" gates on the side of David Kaunda Drive, the semi circular drive way, Davidson’s metal workshop on one side, the cycle shed and car park area, the double-storey main building housing the Administration block, the Staff room, various offices, Jackson’s Technical drawing room, Casson’s Wood work room, Mrs. Costello’s Domestic science room, a number of other class rooms, Banerjee’s Physics lab. and my Biology lab., all built around the spacious quadrangle where morning assemblies were held, Mwambwa’s English departmental office, Mweshi’s Careers room and Asthana’s Science office on the sides, the foyer with its double glass doors on both sides, the show-piece school hall that was once the pride of the school as headmaster A.J.Pillay used to say, the swimming pool, Mrs. Masiye’s Art block, N.M.Pillai’s History block, Mrs. Rajadyn’s Chemistry laboratory on its own, and the new World Bank buildings that accommodated several class rooms are all part of this magnificent building complex. This is where we taught our classes, supervised sports and other activities of our pupils, mingled with them, joked and laughed with them, encouraged and praised them sometimes, reprimanded or punished them at times, played with them and even cried with them whenever tragedy struck the school community and lived for twenty five years. This is where we were loved and admired by our students, liked and respected by our colleagues, trusted and relied upon by our superiors.

The other day, a friend of mine asked me an interesting question: What career would I like to follow if I were given a second chance to do it all over again? I did not have to think twice before answering that I would like to be a teacher at my former school for another twenty five years, teaching the same subject to the same pupils I taught before and having the same old colleagues along with me.

13 comments:

OnlyMe said...

Time for more! Let us see more action. :)

richard longridge said...

HI, ONCE AGAIN! I have read all of your letters in your blogs, and recall our brief exchanges about 10 years ago.
My email address is richard.longridge@sfr.fr

Christian said...

Why have you stopped writing? Though not in Zambia, I lived all my life in a Railway Colony and life was almost the same. I enjoyed reading your posts. Please do keep writing.

Flora Kasonkomona said...

Hi George John, I was born in Mufulira and stumbled upon your blog today. I have started writing my biography and been looking for information on my first school which was a convent school run by nuns around 1969-1972. I have looked on the internet to see what else and I can find and not much else. Your story is very interesting because as I read I am soon reminded of my childhood which was at a very young age. If its not too much to ask I would like to get in touch with you. My email is flor_essence@yahoo.co.uk. I look forward to your reply.

Rodwell Sichula said...

How are you and your family sir? This is Rodwell Sichula who was your biology pupil. I last saw you between 1994 and 1996. I got transferred to Ndola by the company I worked for (Zamtel) to Ndola at the institution training college. I worked as a lecturer, senior lecturer and later Headed a section in the Engineering Department. Thank you for the knowledge you imparted on me at a time I was at Mufulira secondary school. How is your daughter my former class mate Lisa? God bless you. My regards to your family.

George John said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
George John said...

My email ID is shanthisadan@gmail.com

George John

GM said...

Hello Mr. George Johns, I am one of your former students at Mufulira Secondary School. Reading your blog almost brought tears to my eyes because MUF is no longer the way you describe it! Yes How I would cherish to relive that period in my life because Mufulira was just beautiful!

But I was so glad to stumble upon your blog I couldn't believe. May God bless you.

Please forgive me for asking where are you?

George M. Mutale
gmmutale@gmail.com

Romas Kamanga said...

Hi Mr George Jones, That was a good overview of the description of Mufulira and Mufulira High School, in particular, the way I left it. I hear things are no long the same there anymore. I miss those days too when you used to teach us biology. Could really capture my attention then.

Mona said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mona said...

Hello Mr. George Jones, this is Mona Patel. I was in your Biology class from 1984 to 1985 and Mrs. Jones' Civics class from 1981 to 1983. I read your blog and it brought back all the wonderful memories of Mufulira. I wanted to let you know how much I appreciate both of you as my teachers. I am now based in Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. My email is mona2469@sbcglobal.net.

George John said...

Thank you good people for all those kind comments. May God bless you all. If anyone likes to get in touch with me, my email Id is shanthisadan@Gmail.com

Kaoma Milton said...

Mufulira Runs in your Blood. Not even a Zambian can describe this place the way you have done. Its a Great place.